#twetrainingvideo

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Working on halt, walk, trot, transitions.. and bringing her head back up πŸ˜† Somehow I accidentally shaped her going TOO long and low... To the point where I think it's difficult for her to transition into a trot because of it.
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This can happen some times, probably because we get so focused on reinforcing the reaching down that we don't pay close enough attention to HOW far they are reaching down... And, it seems like at some point the horse may think we are wanting them to target the ground. Whoops! 🀷 .
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Instead, I like to look for about knee to mid cannon level with the nose staying at or in front of the vertical. And variability is good too! We don't want a fixed state.
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Thankfully.. the process of correcting this training error is really the original process in reverse. Start capturing moments where there is more elevation in the front end/head/neck, use a target to aid in guiding this process, and usually adding more impulsion (forward lifted movement) will encourage the head to come up too. #twetrainingvideo #csRiver

Working on halt, walk, trot, transitions.. and bringing her head back up πŸ˜† Somehow I accidentally shaped her going TOO long and low... To the point where I think it's difficult for her to transition into a trot because of it. . . This can happen some times, probably because we get so focused on reinforcing the reaching down that we don't pay close enough attention to HOW far they are reaching down... And, it seems like at some point the horse may think we are wanting them to target the ground. Whoops! 🀷 . . Instead, I like to look for about knee to mid cannon level with the nose staying at or in front of the vertical. And variability is good too! We don't want a fixed state. . . Thankfully.. the process of correcting this training error is really the original process in reverse. Start capturing moments where there is more elevation in the front end/head/neck, use a target to aid in guiding this process, and usually adding more impulsion (forward lifted movement) will encourage the head to come up too. #twetrainingvideo #csRiver - 4 days ago

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Wait for it...πŸ˜… Today was very interesting! After having a HUGE breakthrough on Tuesday with Cashmere (she CANTERED at liberty with me for the first time πŸŽ‰πŸŽŠπŸΎπŸ₯³) I wanted to try adding in the bareback pad.
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She has worn the bareback pad quite a few times without issue at the walk, even with me sitting on her, but never at the trot. I found it so interesting to see the difference between her trot without the bareback pad (smooth, in a more forward down position, pleasant expression, very willing) to trotting with it on! It was a HUGE difference. She seemed geniuenly upset by being asked to trot with the pad on, even though she did it voluntarily. It was like having the pad on at the trot caught her by surprise and then she was trying to figure out "how to move" with it on.
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Part of me thinks more time needs to be spent trotting and cantering without the pad, and then having her have the pad on outside of training.. to counter condition it's presence and get her used to moving freely with it on. And part of me thinks that she will need to experience how different it's going to be now when the pad/saddle is on for her to work through the anxiety about it.
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It's definitely going to be a combo of both, with careful attention paid to not flooding her (forcing her to deal with her fear and not giving her a way out, aka "bucking it out"). I want to counter condition having the bareback pad on through creating new positive and low stress associations with it (grazing with it on, having her meals with it on, going on hikes with it, general R+ training with it) ... And if I just strap it on and pressure her into moving and I ignore her way of communicating with me that she's worried (bucking, head rolling, reluctance to move forward, head raised straight up, ears back, eyes wide, licking and chewing, and so on) then I risk doing the exact opposite; further ingraining her fear of having a saddle/bareback pad on.
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So it's going to be a fine line between encouraging progress and avoiding a fear response. Thankfully today I was able to bring her back and ease her anxiety about it. That's what trust looks like. πŸ₯° #twetrainingvideo #ewszcashmere

Wait for it...πŸ˜… Today was very interesting! After having a HUGE breakthrough on Tuesday with Cashmere (she CANTERED at liberty with me for the first time πŸŽ‰πŸŽŠπŸΎπŸ₯³) I wanted to try adding in the bareback pad. . . She has worn the bareback pad quite a few times without issue at the walk, even with me sitting on her, but never at the trot. I found it so interesting to see the difference between her trot without the bareback pad (smooth, in a more forward down position, pleasant expression, very willing) to trotting with it on! It was a HUGE difference. She seemed geniuenly upset by being asked to trot with the pad on, even though she did it voluntarily. It was like having the pad on at the trot caught her by surprise and then she was trying to figure out "how to move" with it on. . . Part of me thinks more time needs to be spent trotting and cantering without the pad, and then having her have the pad on outside of training.. to counter condition it's presence and get her used to moving freely with it on. And part of me thinks that she will need to experience how different it's going to be now when the pad/saddle is on for her to work through the anxiety about it. . . It's definitely going to be a combo of both, with careful attention paid to not flooding her (forcing her to deal with her fear and not giving her a way out, aka "bucking it out"). I want to counter condition having the bareback pad on through creating new positive and low stress associations with it (grazing with it on, having her meals with it on, going on hikes with it, general R+ training with it) ... And if I just strap it on and pressure her into moving and I ignore her way of communicating with me that she's worried (bucking, head rolling, reluctance to move forward, head raised straight up, ears back, eyes wide, licking and chewing, and so on) then I risk doing the exact opposite; further ingraining her fear of having a saddle/bareback pad on. . . So it's going to be a fine line between encouraging progress and avoiding a fear response. Thankfully today I was able to bring her back and ease her anxiety about it. That's what trust looks like. πŸ₯° #twetrainingvideo #ewszcashmere - 8 days ago

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I've finally gotten around to setting up a straight line protected contact area. And... after working with half the horses yesterday my thought was "WHY DID I TAKE SO LONG TO DO THIS?!" πŸ˜…πŸ€¦πŸ€· Probably because Cashmere and River absolutely destroyed my last one so I had to find the time, the money, and physiologically prepare myself for this one to be destroyed too.. BUT here we are... and that one was in a circle and this one is straight and the length of a large jumper arena.
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I've used pasture fences for straight line PC set ups, but this is AMAZING. I can't wait to work with Pumpkin with this too. Unfortunately she's tweaked something on her right front ☹️, but she's SO much fun to work with like this.
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As you can see I worked a little different with each horse.πŸ”ΉFinn is practicing leading; keeping distance from me and stopping with me. πŸ”ΉRiver we are still working to get the trot on cue and add a little "umph" to her movements. πŸ”ΉTiger is a pro at trotting at liberty, we are building duration for physical fitness and going to work up to a canter here soon. This set up is also helping teach her how not to curve in front of me when trotting (the result of a lot of circles). πŸ”ΉAnd Cashmere... 🀩🀩🀩 Getting Cashmere to trot without pressure has been... an educational and patience testing process πŸ˜…. In the first clip I have a food bucket with me because originall that was how we were able to lure her into a trot, and so now it's a "cue"/"prop" I'm fading out. The last clip you can see I don't have it. Prop successfully weaned out!! πŸ™ŒπŸ™Œ (though we will need to repeat this process a couple more times to fully wean it).
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There's so much you can do with protected contact, especially a straight line set up. I love protected contact because it gives the horse a lot of information and helps them feel confident and helps the human be a better trainer πŸ˜‰ #csTiger #csFinn #csRiver #ewszcashmere #twetrainingvideo

I've finally gotten around to setting up a straight line protected contact area. And... after working with half the horses yesterday my thought was "WHY DID I TAKE SO LONG TO DO THIS?!" πŸ˜…πŸ€¦πŸ€· Probably because Cashmere and River absolutely destroyed my last one so I had to find the time, the money, and physiologically prepare myself for this one to be destroyed too.. BUT here we are... and that one was in a circle and this one is straight and the length of a large jumper arena. . . I've used pasture fences for straight line PC set ups, but this is AMAZING. I can't wait to work with Pumpkin with this too. Unfortunately she's tweaked something on her right front ☹️, but she's SO much fun to work with like this. . . As you can see I worked a little different with each horse.πŸ”ΉFinn is practicing leading; keeping distance from me and stopping with me. πŸ”ΉRiver we are still working to get the trot on cue and add a little "umph" to her movements. πŸ”ΉTiger is a pro at trotting at liberty, we are building duration for physical fitness and going to work up to a canter here soon. This set up is also helping teach her how not to curve in front of me when trotting (the result of a lot of circles). πŸ”ΉAnd Cashmere... 🀩🀩🀩 Getting Cashmere to trot without pressure has been... an educational and patience testing process πŸ˜…. In the first clip I have a food bucket with me because originall that was how we were able to lure her into a trot, and so now it's a "cue"/"prop" I'm fading out. The last clip you can see I don't have it. Prop successfully weaned out!! πŸ™ŒπŸ™Œ (though we will need to repeat this process a couple more times to fully wean it). . . There's so much you can do with protected contact, especially a straight line set up. I love protected contact because it gives the horse a lot of information and helps them feel confident and helps the human be a better trainer πŸ˜‰ #csTiger #csFinn #csRiver #ewszcashmere #twetrainingvideo - 24 days ago

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Finn is such a perfect little angel. I love him. And even better, my kiddos love him. They were learning how to respect Finn's choices here. If he was on the mat, they could groom him, but if he stepped off they had to stop touching him and back away. I was also feeding Finn while he was on the mat (and he had food available if he was off too... He could leave to go get grass and I'd also put some pellets on the ground) to help him stay calm and feel being on the mat was a really good place to be. Creating positive associations with my kids, being groomed, and being on the mat.
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I wish I had gotten the camera out earlier because there were multiple "clearer" examples of how this process worked earlier on. My kids would watch his feet and if he even took one step off the mat they would completely back away. Sometimes he would even walk off and go explore the barn then come back, when he came back they were allowed to slowly approach him again (it was tough to get them to *slowly* approach! But they did good!)
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There are moments in these clips he's a little worried, it was a lot to ask of him .. to tolerate three noisy random movement making kids surrounding him. I plan to "decrease the criteria" by going back to practicing with just one kid then building back up to three.
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And in case anyone is wondering... My shirt says "drink coffee, put some gangsta music on, and handle it" πŸ˜† that's my motto when working and having all three kids with me (half of them sick). Except ... Now it's "kids bop" instead of what I used to listen to πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚. πŸ™ˆπŸ™‰πŸ™Š #csFinn #twetrainingvideo

Finn is such a perfect little angel. I love him. And even better, my kiddos love him. They were learning how to respect Finn's choices here. If he was on the mat, they could groom him, but if he stepped off they had to stop touching him and back away. I was also feeding Finn while he was on the mat (and he had food available if he was off too... He could leave to go get grass and I'd also put some pellets on the ground) to help him stay calm and feel being on the mat was a really good place to be. Creating positive associations with my kids, being groomed, and being on the mat. . . I wish I had gotten the camera out earlier because there were multiple "clearer" examples of how this process worked earlier on. My kids would watch his feet and if he even took one step off the mat they would completely back away. Sometimes he would even walk off and go explore the barn then come back, when he came back they were allowed to slowly approach him again (it was tough to get them to *slowly* approach! But they did good!) . . There are moments in these clips he's a little worried, it was a lot to ask of him .. to tolerate three noisy random movement making kids surrounding him. I plan to "decrease the criteria" by going back to practicing with just one kid then building back up to three. . . And in case anyone is wondering... My shirt says "drink coffee, put some gangsta music on, and handle it" πŸ˜† that's my motto when working and having all three kids with me (half of them sick). Except ... Now it's "kids bop" instead of what I used to listen to πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚. πŸ™ˆπŸ™‰πŸ™Š #csFinn #twetrainingvideo - 27 days ago

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Cash is really enjoying this new game!  And I also think he's really enjoying the new bareback pad. He's seems much more comfortable when a rider first gets on and is more willing to move than with a regular bareback pad (and definitely more than with a saddle).
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Can't wait to get a different ball and keep building onto this game (one that is bigger and rolls easier, my dog keeps popping them). Pretty soon he's going to be chasing it all over the place and the rider is going to have a LOT of fun πŸ˜†. It'll be a HUGE change from his usual slow motion movements. 😊
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I was also very happy that my daughter actively wanted to ride today. She likes the horses a lot, but the heat (102F heat index today) has been a challenge for her in the past and the pull of going to Nana's (my parents live on property) has been a huge distraction for her whenever I want to give her an opportunity to work with the horses. Nana is just WAY COOL. πŸ˜† She also has delicious popsicles, AC, and lots of fun projects. So the reinforcement she gets for opting to go to Nana's is VERY high and hard to compete with. πŸ™ƒ But that's okay. I don't want to make her do anything and she has many years ahead of her to get addicted to horses. πŸ˜‰ (It just needs to kick in before the boy and cell phone phase starts πŸ˜…).
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Cash is her boy though. They do VERY well together and take good care of each other. πŸ₯° #csCash #twetrainingvideo

Cash is really enjoying this new game! And I also think he's really enjoying the new bareback pad. He's seems much more comfortable when a rider first gets on and is more willing to move than with a regular bareback pad (and definitely more than with a saddle). . . Can't wait to get a different ball and keep building onto this game (one that is bigger and rolls easier, my dog keeps popping them). Pretty soon he's going to be chasing it all over the place and the rider is going to have a LOT of fun πŸ˜†. It'll be a HUGE change from his usual slow motion movements. 😊 . . I was also very happy that my daughter actively wanted to ride today. She likes the horses a lot, but the heat (102F heat index today) has been a challenge for her in the past and the pull of going to Nana's (my parents live on property) has been a huge distraction for her whenever I want to give her an opportunity to work with the horses. Nana is just WAY COOL. πŸ˜† She also has delicious popsicles, AC, and lots of fun projects. So the reinforcement she gets for opting to go to Nana's is VERY high and hard to compete with. πŸ™ƒ But that's okay. I don't want to make her do anything and she has many years ahead of her to get addicted to horses. πŸ˜‰ (It just needs to kick in before the boy and cell phone phase starts πŸ˜…). . . Cash is her boy though. They do VERY well together and take good care of each other. πŸ₯° #csCash #twetrainingvideo - 28 days ago

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SayfamΔ±zΔ± ziyaret etmeyi unutmayΔ±n.. . . . . 
#throwback #bored #onepunchman #instalive #twetrainingvideo #liverpool #livro #tagsforlikes #jj_forum #beğen #kaydet☝ #yorumat #etiketlemepostu

Sayfamızı ziyaret etmeyi unutmayın.. . . . . #throwback #bored #onepunchman #instalive #twetrainingvideo #liverpool #livro #tagsforlikes #jj_forum #beğen #kaydet ☝ #yorumat #etiketlemepostu - 30 days ago

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Building miss River's confidence on backing off steps with @lolliannn . This has been an ongoing source of stress for River whenever we travel. She will self load any time that trailer door is open, and LOVES to travel (legitimately loves to travel, she's one of the only horses I know that really really enjoys traveling), but backing back out of my drop off trailer is a πŸš«β›”πŸ™…πŸ‘Ž. Unfortunately she's getting too big to turn around though! 😬.
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Thankfully she's making big progress in this area and we are SO CLOSE. Last time I had horses in the trailer I found a spot on the property that makes it so there's almost no drop off, and I figured out how to stabilize the back end of the trailer so it doesn't rock as much while backing out... I think that's going to be the trick to get River used to backing out. And as she's more comfortable we can gradually work it back up to "normal", since obviously I'll need her to back out everywhere. Not just at a specific spot at home with trailer supports πŸ˜†. Baby steps though! When a horse has extreme fears of something you can't force it or rush it, you just have to make whatever the issue is .. seem like a non-issue by breaking down the source of the fear into bite size pieces and build back up as they are comfortable. #csRiver #twetrainingvideo #twetrainingtip

Building miss River's confidence on backing off steps with @lolliannn . This has been an ongoing source of stress for River whenever we travel. She will self load any time that trailer door is open, and LOVES to travel (legitimately loves to travel, she's one of the only horses I know that really really enjoys traveling), but backing back out of my drop off trailer is a πŸš«β›”πŸ™…πŸ‘Ž. Unfortunately she's getting too big to turn around though! 😬. . Thankfully she's making big progress in this area and we are SO CLOSE. Last time I had horses in the trailer I found a spot on the property that makes it so there's almost no drop off, and I figured out how to stabilize the back end of the trailer so it doesn't rock as much while backing out... I think that's going to be the trick to get River used to backing out. And as she's more comfortable we can gradually work it back up to "normal", since obviously I'll need her to back out everywhere. Not just at a specific spot at home with trailer supports πŸ˜†. Baby steps though! When a horse has extreme fears of something you can't force it or rush it, you just have to make whatever the issue is .. seem like a non-issue by breaking down the source of the fear into bite size pieces and build back up as they are comfortable. #csRiver #twetrainingvideo #twetrainingtip - 1 month ago

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Who remembers when River used to HATE water? Wouldn't go near it, into it, let you spray her with it .. #nope πŸ˜† Not anymore!
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I was spraying off Queen Cashmere, because she was soaked in sweat just walking around the pasture (real feel is 100s and the humidity is around 60%... She just looked miserable...) Anyway, brought out the hose (that barely reached) and offered a hose down to whomever wished to partake.
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Cashmere was VERY in for this cool down (she was SO much happier after. Less head tossing and more relaxed substantially)  and after a few minutes River wanted in too! I gave some hay pellets every so often, but mostly they just stood their and enjoyed the hose down. I don't think I'll ever have an issue with River and water ever again thanks to R+ and Counter Conditioning. πŸ˜‰πŸ₯°πŸ˜ #csRiver #ewszcashmere

Who remembers when River used to HATE water? Wouldn't go near it, into it, let you spray her with it .. #nope πŸ˜† Not anymore! . . I was spraying off Queen Cashmere, because she was soaked in sweat just walking around the pasture (real feel is 100s and the humidity is around 60%... She just looked miserable...) Anyway, brought out the hose (that barely reached) and offered a hose down to whomever wished to partake. . . Cashmere was VERY in for this cool down (she was SO much happier after. Less head tossing and more relaxed substantially) and after a few minutes River wanted in too! I gave some hay pellets every so often, but mostly they just stood their and enjoyed the hose down. I don't think I'll ever have an issue with River and water ever again thanks to R+ and Counter Conditioning. πŸ˜‰πŸ₯°πŸ˜ #csRiver #ewszcashmere - 2 months ago

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"Positive reinforcement" [doesn't] refer to just any nice reward you [think] the animal *might* like, or ought to like (such as praise), but only to certain kinds of items or events, identified by their results. A positive reinforcer is something the animal likes enough to work for, that strengthens a behavior in the future, making it bigger, stronger, and more apt to happen again." - ✍️ Karen Pryor (Reaching The Animal Mind - link in bio)
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I've found that this right here is KEY. People in general like to think they are rewarding their animals by petting them or praising them, thinking that is adequate reward for the animal... But does your animal actually *like* being pet or praised? Does it like THAT kind or petting? Or in THAT spot?
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In these video clips I show pets/scratches in different locations, intended to be rewarding/enjoyable for the horse... But only one location is liked and the other clearly is not. In fact, one of these examples may actually be a punisher to the horse and DECREASE the horse doing whatever it was we were *trying* to reward. (You'll also notice a quick moment of food being used for R+ as well)
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Some horses don't really find being touched is reinforcing at all even. They actively dislike being touched and so using pets and scratches and pats would be an unpleasant experience for them and probably then act as a punisher.
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Same idea goes for the type of food reward you're offering your horse. I made the mistake one time of filling a mock deworming paste tube with applesauce for a training session.... Only to find out the horse HATED applesauce. She had been willing to put the tube in her mouth voluntarily until I squeezed a little apple sauce into her mouth from the tube.. 🀦 she refused to put it back in her mouth after that.
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**Lesson learned**. Test out whatever you would like to use as a reinforcer PRIOR to training. If your horse doesnt ask for more, it's not something that will be positively reinforcing... it will NOT encourage more of the behavior you want. No matter how much we want it to, unfortunately we don't get to decide.
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#twetrainingvideo #twetrainingtip #csTiger

"Positive reinforcement" [doesn't] refer to just any nice reward you [think] the animal *might* like, or ought to like (such as praise), but only to certain kinds of items or events, identified by their results. A positive reinforcer is something the animal likes enough to work for, that strengthens a behavior in the future, making it bigger, stronger, and more apt to happen again." - ✍️ Karen Pryor (Reaching The Animal Mind - link in bio) . . I've found that this right here is KEY. People in general like to think they are rewarding their animals by petting them or praising them, thinking that is adequate reward for the animal... But does your animal actually *like* being pet or praised? Does it like THAT kind or petting? Or in THAT spot? . . In these video clips I show pets/scratches in different locations, intended to be rewarding/enjoyable for the horse... But only one location is liked and the other clearly is not. In fact, one of these examples may actually be a punisher to the horse and DECREASE the horse doing whatever it was we were *trying* to reward. (You'll also notice a quick moment of food being used for R+ as well) . . Some horses don't really find being touched is reinforcing at all even. They actively dislike being touched and so using pets and scratches and pats would be an unpleasant experience for them and probably then act as a punisher. . . Same idea goes for the type of food reward you're offering your horse. I made the mistake one time of filling a mock deworming paste tube with applesauce for a training session.... Only to find out the horse HATED applesauce. She had been willing to put the tube in her mouth voluntarily until I squeezed a little apple sauce into her mouth from the tube.. 🀦 she refused to put it back in her mouth after that. . . **Lesson learned**. Test out whatever you would like to use as a reinforcer PRIOR to training. If your horse doesnt ask for more, it's not something that will be positively reinforcing... it will NOT encourage more of the behavior you want. No matter how much we want it to, unfortunately we don't get to decide. . . #twetrainingvideo #twetrainingtip #csTiger - 2 months ago

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My lovely intern Lillian working with miss Pumpkin on stationing at the mounting block. πŸ₯°
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The sideways hip/hind end motion is not the easiest for Pumpkin physically. She gets very over intense about the motion because it's challenging for her.. so she performs it in an "all or nothing" kind of way, where she will just throw her hind end at you or do nothing at all. Which means as much as she CAN swing herself into position quickly we don't WANT her to do it THAT intensely and in a frustrated way. So... we've broken it down and are working on just asking for baby steps towards the block then moving on to something else. Because she WILL, in her enthusiasm, accidentally knock you off the mounting block πŸ˜… It'll just take more practice and and continuing to break it down smaller for her to help her feel more at ease with the behavior. .
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Lillian and Pumpkin have really "clicked" as of late too. Lillian has been with me almost six weeks and she's just now unlocking the full potential of miss Pumpkin and how much fun working with her can be. Pumpkin is just not an easy one to "get" right away, you have to earn it... but once you earn it she's ALL in. πŸ˜‰ unfortunately... Lillian goes home next week and I'm VERY upset. We are already scheduling her return. πŸ˜…
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My favorite is at the end. Pumpkin is like "I did good, I deserve all the yums!" πŸ₯°
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#csPumpkin #twetrainingvideo

My lovely intern Lillian working with miss Pumpkin on stationing at the mounting block. πŸ₯° . . The sideways hip/hind end motion is not the easiest for Pumpkin physically. She gets very over intense about the motion because it's challenging for her.. so she performs it in an "all or nothing" kind of way, where she will just throw her hind end at you or do nothing at all. Which means as much as she CAN swing herself into position quickly we don't WANT her to do it THAT intensely and in a frustrated way. So... we've broken it down and are working on just asking for baby steps towards the block then moving on to something else. Because she WILL, in her enthusiasm, accidentally knock you off the mounting block πŸ˜… It'll just take more practice and and continuing to break it down smaller for her to help her feel more at ease with the behavior. . . Lillian and Pumpkin have really "clicked" as of late too. Lillian has been with me almost six weeks and she's just now unlocking the full potential of miss Pumpkin and how much fun working with her can be. Pumpkin is just not an easy one to "get" right away, you have to earn it... but once you earn it she's ALL in. πŸ˜‰ unfortunately... Lillian goes home next week and I'm VERY upset. We are already scheduling her return. πŸ˜… . . My favorite is at the end. Pumpkin is like "I did good, I deserve all the yums!" πŸ₯° . . #csPumpkin #twetrainingvideo - 2 months ago

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I can't tell you how tempted I am just to get on πŸ˜…. SO CLOSE. But I'm determined to wait.
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I still want her to be more confident about stationing next to the mounting block on cue (notice the slight ears back and slowness of responses), and I still want to spend more time getting her used to non human weight (using weighted bags on a bareback pad or a saddle)... AND I'm still wanting her to be much closer to 4 (April 2020) before I even sit on her or start the very very gradual and strategic weight loading exercises.
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In the meantime she can learn how to offer to be mounted in different locations (fence, log, rock, mounting block, etc), spend more time with a bareback pad, learn more about rein cues and vocal cues, ground drive, and more! There's really SO much to do to prepare a horse for a rider that there's never any reason to rush getting on for the first time. I have plenty to keep me busy until spring 2020. And even then it'll be a lot of get on/get off, letting her choose when to move and not move, learning to balance and carry herself "correctly" with a rider etc. #csRiver #twetrainingvideo #csriverprogress

I can't tell you how tempted I am just to get on πŸ˜…. SO CLOSE. But I'm determined to wait. . . I still want her to be more confident about stationing next to the mounting block on cue (notice the slight ears back and slowness of responses), and I still want to spend more time getting her used to non human weight (using weighted bags on a bareback pad or a saddle)... AND I'm still wanting her to be much closer to 4 (April 2020) before I even sit on her or start the very very gradual and strategic weight loading exercises. . . In the meantime she can learn how to offer to be mounted in different locations (fence, log, rock, mounting block, etc), spend more time with a bareback pad, learn more about rein cues and vocal cues, ground drive, and more! There's really SO much to do to prepare a horse for a rider that there's never any reason to rush getting on for the first time. I have plenty to keep me busy until spring 2020. And even then it'll be a lot of get on/get off, letting her choose when to move and not move, learning to balance and carry herself "correctly" with a rider etc. #csRiver #twetrainingvideo #csriverprogress - 2 months ago

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Having trouble working with your horse over grass? Why not use the grass? If that's what your horse wants, why fight it? Bonus, it'll also save you money πŸ˜‰
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And yes, people will look at you weird πŸ˜† but you know what, who cares. Haha.
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What's something odd you've done for or with your horse (training related or not) that got some odd looks? I know for many of you, just the act of clicker training is the odd look instigator! Haha. #csTiger #twetrainingvideo #twetrainingtip

Having trouble working with your horse over grass? Why not use the grass? If that's what your horse wants, why fight it? Bonus, it'll also save you money πŸ˜‰ . . And yes, people will look at you weird πŸ˜† but you know what, who cares. Haha. . . What's something odd you've done for or with your horse (training related or not) that got some odd looks? I know for many of you, just the act of clicker training is the odd look instigator! Haha. #csTiger #twetrainingvideo #twetrainingtip - 2 months ago

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Can you spot the start button behavior? Meaning... What Biscuit is doing to tell me he's ready? (Comment before reading the rest πŸ˜‰)
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I know this doesn't look like a lot, but this is a LOT. From biting at me any time any part of me was within reach, walking circles around me, or lagging behind, and dropping whenever working with food... to.... quietly leading with a start button behavior, having a cue for standing quietly, no dropping, and no biting, and also (not shown) a cue for backing up. πŸ™Œ
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It's not all fool proof yet, meaning there's occasional relapses and problem solving still happening, but it's MAJOR progress. We are also still working on fading out the target as well as increasing walking distance in between click/rewards. It's happening though!
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Anyway, so that start button! Yes! You probably saw it. Biscuit takes a little step backwards to indicate to me he's ready for me to ask him to "walk on". He only does this when I'm facing forward (my cue to him that that's what I'm looking for). If I'm facing towards his shoulder this is the cue to stand still, and if I face towards his chest this is the indicator that we will be backing up. So while facing forward is an "invitation", I wait for him to accept the invitation with a step back and then I cue "walk on"... Which then gets clicked/rewarded. I've been teaching this process to all my horses and I'm really excited about the results so far! .(Thanks to Peggy Hogan for the inspiration!) .
Biscuit has also earned ranch roaming rights, where I let him and Finn out loose and they get to go play and explore wherever they like. Funny enough he hangs out wherever I am πŸ₯°  #twetrainingvideo #twetraininghorses

Can you spot the start button behavior? Meaning... What Biscuit is doing to tell me he's ready? (Comment before reading the rest πŸ˜‰) . . I know this doesn't look like a lot, but this is a LOT. From biting at me any time any part of me was within reach, walking circles around me, or lagging behind, and dropping whenever working with food... to.... quietly leading with a start button behavior, having a cue for standing quietly, no dropping, and no biting, and also (not shown) a cue for backing up. πŸ™Œ . . It's not all fool proof yet, meaning there's occasional relapses and problem solving still happening, but it's MAJOR progress. We are also still working on fading out the target as well as increasing walking distance in between click/rewards. It's happening though! . . Anyway, so that start button! Yes! You probably saw it. Biscuit takes a little step backwards to indicate to me he's ready for me to ask him to "walk on". He only does this when I'm facing forward (my cue to him that that's what I'm looking for). If I'm facing towards his shoulder this is the cue to stand still, and if I face towards his chest this is the indicator that we will be backing up. So while facing forward is an "invitation", I wait for him to accept the invitation with a step back and then I cue "walk on"... Which then gets clicked/rewarded. I've been teaching this process to all my horses and I'm really excited about the results so far! .(Thanks to Peggy Hogan for the inspiration!) . Biscuit has also earned ranch roaming rights, where I let him and Finn out loose and they get to go play and explore wherever they like. Funny enough he hangs out wherever I am πŸ₯° #twetrainingvideo #twetraininghorses - 2 months ago

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Okay, I LOVE working with positive reinforcement and clicker training. I can promise you, you will never have as much fun training an animal. πŸ˜†
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I wish we had gotten this whole session on video. SOMEHOW, as we were training an "A to B" behavior (going from @equineapprentice to me and then back again), we accidentally shaped a backing up from me to Sara! We had unintentionally taught Cashmere that she was supposed to come forward to me and then back up to Sara. She did this probably four different times consistently, so it was absolutely built into the behavior, definitely not an accidental moment. We had to back up quite a few steps in the training to undo our very funny mistake...
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This is where the importance of timing and understanding the building process of behaviors is so important. Even with experienced clicker trained horses (ESPECIALLY with experienced clicker trained horses), if the timing is off even just a little or you're not focused on very subtle changes creeping into the behavior, you'll find yourself with something completely unintentional developing.
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That "something" could be as subtle as the horse thinking they are SUPPOSED to have their ears back during trot work, or as blatantly obvious as backing up when they are supposed to go forward (whoops πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚). The beautiful part though is that no corrections/pressure/punishment were needed to alter this, just downsizing our criteria (what the horse was being asked to do) and rebuilding the behavior the way we intend to.
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We could have also taken this opportunity to ditch the original plan and create a really solid back up away from a stationary human. So much potential really! Even "mistakes" during clicker training/shaping can be fun successes if you let them!
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#ewszcashmere #twetrainingvideo  #twetraininghorses

Okay, I LOVE working with positive reinforcement and clicker training. I can promise you, you will never have as much fun training an animal. πŸ˜† . . I wish we had gotten this whole session on video. SOMEHOW, as we were training an "A to B" behavior (going from @equineapprentice to me and then back again), we accidentally shaped a backing up from me to Sara! We had unintentionally taught Cashmere that she was supposed to come forward to me and then back up to Sara. She did this probably four different times consistently, so it was absolutely built into the behavior, definitely not an accidental moment. We had to back up quite a few steps in the training to undo our very funny mistake... . . This is where the importance of timing and understanding the building process of behaviors is so important. Even with experienced clicker trained horses (ESPECIALLY with experienced clicker trained horses), if the timing is off even just a little or you're not focused on very subtle changes creeping into the behavior, you'll find yourself with something completely unintentional developing. . . That "something" could be as subtle as the horse thinking they are SUPPOSED to have their ears back during trot work, or as blatantly obvious as backing up when they are supposed to go forward (whoops πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚). The beautiful part though is that no corrections/pressure/punishment were needed to alter this, just downsizing our criteria (what the horse was being asked to do) and rebuilding the behavior the way we intend to. . . We could have also taken this opportunity to ditch the original plan and create a really solid back up away from a stationary human. So much potential really! Even "mistakes" during clicker training/shaping can be fun successes if you let them! . . #ewszcashmere #twetrainingvideo #twetraininghorses - 3 months ago

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Working on getting back into shape after our many many months of dental work and recovery πŸ’ͺ
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I can't remember the last time I lunged in the arena β€” I just prefer to work over varying terrain most of the time, there are benefits to the arena sand too... the sand creates resistance which can strengthen legs and muscles (just make sure there isn't TOO much), but there are a tremendous amount of benefits to stepping outside the arena too! Especially if there are hills and different kinds of footing... Look at that nice stretching and leg action too! 😍
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#csPumpkin #appaloosa #twetrainingvideo #twetrainingtip #horses #horsesofinstagram #instahorse #animallovers #animallover #positivereinforcement #clickertraining #positivehorsemanship #horsetrainer #traininghorses #horsetrainer #horsemanship #clickertrainedhorse #thewillingequine #picoftheday #blogger

Working on getting back into shape after our many many months of dental work and recovery πŸ’ͺ . . I can't remember the last time I lunged in the arena β€” I just prefer to work over varying terrain most of the time, there are benefits to the arena sand too... the sand creates resistance which can strengthen legs and muscles (just make sure there isn't TOO much), but there are a tremendous amount of benefits to stepping outside the arena too! Especially if there are hills and different kinds of footing... Look at that nice stretching and leg action too! 😍 . . #csPumpkin #appaloosa #twetrainingvideo #twetrainingtip #horses #horsesofinstagram #instahorse #animallovers #animallover #positivereinforcement #clickertraining #positivehorsemanship #horsetrainer #traininghorses #horsetrainer #horsemanship #clickertrainedhorse #thewillingequine #picoftheday #blogger - 3 months ago

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Start button behaviors are my newest obsession. 🀩 What's a start button behavior? It's a behavior that the learner learns to offer that "starts" a follow-up behavior/action. And... because they understand that one predicts the next... they are in control of whether the second behavior/action happens and how it happens, because they wont offer the first if they don't want the second.
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This really gives the horse a whole new level of control/choice in their training and give the us an exciting amount of info/feedback about the training. I no longer have to rely on *just* reading body language, they can tell me through a very simple action! πŸ™Œ
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In this video Tiger is in control of when or if I get on the mounting block (and eventually when I get on her back). The start button (SB) she has been taught is lowering her head. She lowers her head when she's ready.
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Here I quickly show a progression of how this works. ➑️ First couple repetitions, establishing the SB (head down) on it's own; head down, click/reward. ➑️ And each following repetition, waiting for the SB and then taking a tiny step towards the mounting block, click/reward, re-set, wait for the SB. ➑️ Repeat or progress a little further during each successive repetition unless the SB comes slower or not at all; which could mean you progressed too quickly, they don't understand, or are worried. The SB will happen quickly if the horse is comfortable with repeating or progressing forward.
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During this session we did not make it any further, though we had previously. Her lower back was sore (she was in season, a common symptom) so that's likely why she didn't give me a start button to proceed forward... And you know what, YAY!!πŸ‘ As much as I wanted to get on, I'd rather know when I'm on the ground that she's uncomfortable, than to get on and cause pain or stress, or cause her to escalate to dangerous behaviors to communicate her discomfort.
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In the future, when the SB is well established and she's more comfortable with being gotten on, I'll be able to ask her once and then get on. We won't have to do this series each time.
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#twetrainingvideo #csTiger #twetrainingtip #tweeducational

Start button behaviors are my newest obsession. 🀩 What's a start button behavior? It's a behavior that the learner learns to offer that "starts" a follow-up behavior/action. And... because they understand that one predicts the next... they are in control of whether the second behavior/action happens and how it happens, because they wont offer the first if they don't want the second. . . This really gives the horse a whole new level of control/choice in their training and give the us an exciting amount of info/feedback about the training. I no longer have to rely on *just* reading body language, they can tell me through a very simple action! πŸ™Œ . . In this video Tiger is in control of when or if I get on the mounting block (and eventually when I get on her back). The start button (SB) she has been taught is lowering her head. She lowers her head when she's ready. . . Here I quickly show a progression of how this works. ➑️ First couple repetitions, establishing the SB (head down) on it's own; head down, click/reward. ➑️ And each following repetition, waiting for the SB and then taking a tiny step towards the mounting block, click/reward, re-set, wait for the SB. ➑️ Repeat or progress a little further during each successive repetition unless the SB comes slower or not at all; which could mean you progressed too quickly, they don't understand, or are worried. The SB will happen quickly if the horse is comfortable with repeating or progressing forward. . . During this session we did not make it any further, though we had previously. Her lower back was sore (she was in season, a common symptom) so that's likely why she didn't give me a start button to proceed forward... And you know what, YAY!!πŸ‘ As much as I wanted to get on, I'd rather know when I'm on the ground that she's uncomfortable, than to get on and cause pain or stress, or cause her to escalate to dangerous behaviors to communicate her discomfort. . . In the future, when the SB is well established and she's more comfortable with being gotten on, I'll be able to ask her once and then get on. We won't have to do this series each time. . . #twetrainingvideo #csTiger #twetrainingtip #tweeducational - 3 months ago

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My youngest and I have been working on teaching little Finn how to lead beside her without pulling or lagging behind. this basically has looked like teaching Finn to lead beside me, either at liberty or on lead rope, and then transferring that leading to walking beside my daughter. The idea is that he will learn that reinforcement happens when he is shoulder to shoulder with my daughter and matches her pace, and since she's not quite old enough to be able to do this training on her own.. I'm helping out. πŸ˜‰
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Eventually I will drift further and further away so he's less dependent on my presence and truly understands that he's being reinforced for leading beside her. She will then be able to lead her pony completely on her own without assistance (though her age may require assistance for a time, as she has a short attention span and I want everyone to be safe 😊️).
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We also do this without a lead as well, which is even safer.. definitely getting a shorter lead rope though to help with the amount of "stuff" in her hands.
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Training pouch by @thetrainerspouch (code : TWE25 )
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#csFinn #twetrainingvideo #horses #horsesofinstagram #instahorse #animallovers #animallover #positivereinforcement #clickertraining #positivehorsemanship #horsetrainer #traininghorses #horsetrainer #horsemanship #clickertrainedhorse #thewillingequine #picoftheday #pony #shetland #minipony #smallhorse #kidsandponies #cute #adorable #beautiful

My youngest and I have been working on teaching little Finn how to lead beside her without pulling or lagging behind. this basically has looked like teaching Finn to lead beside me, either at liberty or on lead rope, and then transferring that leading to walking beside my daughter. The idea is that he will learn that reinforcement happens when he is shoulder to shoulder with my daughter and matches her pace, and since she's not quite old enough to be able to do this training on her own.. I'm helping out. πŸ˜‰ . . Eventually I will drift further and further away so he's less dependent on my presence and truly understands that he's being reinforced for leading beside her. She will then be able to lead her pony completely on her own without assistance (though her age may require assistance for a time, as she has a short attention span and I want everyone to be safe 😊️). . . We also do this without a lead as well, which is even safer.. definitely getting a shorter lead rope though to help with the amount of "stuff" in her hands. . . Training pouch by @thetrainerspouch (code : TWE25 ) . . #csFinn #twetrainingvideo #horses #horsesofinstagram #instahorse #animallovers #animallover #positivereinforcement #clickertraining #positivehorsemanship #horsetrainer #traininghorses #horsetrainer #horsemanship #clickertrainedhorse #thewillingequine #picoftheday #pony #shetland #minipony #smallhorse #kidsandponies #cute #adorable #beautiful - 3 months ago

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Just a little bit more of some of the pattern work I do. Can y'all tell how much I love patterns and cones and setting up "courses"? I love mixing them up, varying between paces and types of obstacles... In this one pattern (a square of sorts), we are practicing.....
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Leg yields, cone targeting, trotting, trot/walk transitions, halt transitions, cavalettis, leading, staying with me at liberty, long and low, inside bend, corners, pace control, staying focused, adding multiple behaviors together in between clicks, and so much more. And easily I could add other things to this... square halts, turn on the haunches, turn on the forehand, multiple jumps, stationary mats... I mean, seriously, the possibilities are endless. As long as each individual behavior has been individually taught and is ready to be added into a pattern, you can add it!
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Have you played around with creating patterns like these? What's a recent one you've set up and been working on with your horse?
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#csTiger #twetrainingvideo

Just a little bit more of some of the pattern work I do. Can y'all tell how much I love patterns and cones and setting up "courses"? I love mixing them up, varying between paces and types of obstacles... In this one pattern (a square of sorts), we are practicing..... . . Leg yields, cone targeting, trotting, trot/walk transitions, halt transitions, cavalettis, leading, staying with me at liberty, long and low, inside bend, corners, pace control, staying focused, adding multiple behaviors together in between clicks, and so much more. And easily I could add other things to this... square halts, turn on the haunches, turn on the forehand, multiple jumps, stationary mats... I mean, seriously, the possibilities are endless. As long as each individual behavior has been individually taught and is ready to be added into a pattern, you can add it! . . Have you played around with creating patterns like these? What's a recent one you've set up and been working on with your horse? . . #csTiger #twetrainingvideo - 3 months ago

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For her birthday, River got to play queen of the dirt hill and go on a walk at liberty on the property. I like to call these "adventure walks" because they are all about exploring and letting the horse choose the path we take.
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These are my favorite times with River. I enjoy our other training too, but I love fostering and encouraging her curiosity... And knowing she truly is choosing to be with me, even when the floor is covered in food she doesn't usually have access to.
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Sometimes she says no though, and while it's disappointing, it's okay. It's a struggle to not be tempted to just... "encourage" her to come with me. (aka add a little pressure, intentionally or unintentionally until she follows with me) You know, because "if she just could only see how much fun this is going to be she'd want to come.." . And while the intentions are good, and this is SO tempting to do (trust me, I find myself here more often than I'd like to admit), there's a high risk to doing this. To overriding the horse's choice in the matter after you have told them that they have a choice.
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Sometimes it's not a big deal, and they seem to be just as ready to offer a yes as before. And sometimes.... they start saying no more than they used to. Their trust in the human has been compromised, because the human lied. They told the horse they had a choice, and then they insisted (even if very kindly) that they MUST say yes.
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Building trust and willingness in a horse is all about being consist, clear, and honest. Don't try and trick your horse into doing something through bribery, and don't lie to them by telling them they have a choice and then overriding it. Give them a choice or don't, but be consistent. Be honest with your horse.
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#csRiver #twetrainingvideo #twetrainingtip

For her birthday, River got to play queen of the dirt hill and go on a walk at liberty on the property. I like to call these "adventure walks" because they are all about exploring and letting the horse choose the path we take. . . These are my favorite times with River. I enjoy our other training too, but I love fostering and encouraging her curiosity... And knowing she truly is choosing to be with me, even when the floor is covered in food she doesn't usually have access to. . . Sometimes she says no though, and while it's disappointing, it's okay. It's a struggle to not be tempted to just... "encourage" her to come with me. (aka add a little pressure, intentionally or unintentionally until she follows with me) You know, because "if she just could only see how much fun this is going to be she'd want to come.." . And while the intentions are good, and this is SO tempting to do (trust me, I find myself here more often than I'd like to admit), there's a high risk to doing this. To overriding the horse's choice in the matter after you have told them that they have a choice. . . Sometimes it's not a big deal, and they seem to be just as ready to offer a yes as before. And sometimes.... they start saying no more than they used to. Their trust in the human has been compromised, because the human lied. They told the horse they had a choice, and then they insisted (even if very kindly) that they MUST say yes. . . Building trust and willingness in a horse is all about being consist, clear, and honest. Don't try and trick your horse into doing something through bribery, and don't lie to them by telling them they have a choice and then overriding it. Give them a choice or don't, but be consistent. Be honest with your horse. . . #csRiver #twetrainingvideo #twetrainingtip - 3 months ago

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Mr. Biscuit learning the beginning stages of walking to and from cones for future pattern work. He's SO smart, I love it. We are still working through some food anxiety and fine tuning manners, but it's happening fast now!
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Both of the ponies I have with me right now are VERY smart. Part of me wonders if the reason ponies have gotten such a bad wrap over the years (you know... the jokes about how terrible they are ..."ponies are evil") is because humans try to man handle them because they are small instead of actually training them, like the horses they are. And not only that, they are smart! They deserve patient, kind, consistent, clear, handling and training just like any other horse, but are rarely given it. Instead, we just expect them to go along with the plan and "deal with it" because they are small enough for us to ignore or overpower their minor resistances and attempts to communicate. We are less scared of them, because of their size, so we just blaze ahead and do whatever we feel like. We already barely recognize stress and fear signs in full size horses, we are FAR less likely to pay attention to them in a small horse. .
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What do you think? Why do you think ponies have a bad wrap in some circles?
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 #twetraininghorses #twetrainingvideo #horses #horsesofinstagram #instahorse #animallovers #animallover #positivereinforcement #clickertraining #positivehorsemanship #horsetrainer #traininghorses #horsetrainer #horsemanship #clickertrainedhorse #thewillingequine #picoftheday #pony #minipony #smallhorse #kidsandponies #cute #adorable #beautiful

Mr. Biscuit learning the beginning stages of walking to and from cones for future pattern work. He's SO smart, I love it. We are still working through some food anxiety and fine tuning manners, but it's happening fast now! . . Both of the ponies I have with me right now are VERY smart. Part of me wonders if the reason ponies have gotten such a bad wrap over the years (you know... the jokes about how terrible they are ..."ponies are evil") is because humans try to man handle them because they are small instead of actually training them, like the horses they are. And not only that, they are smart! They deserve patient, kind, consistent, clear, handling and training just like any other horse, but are rarely given it. Instead, we just expect them to go along with the plan and "deal with it" because they are small enough for us to ignore or overpower their minor resistances and attempts to communicate. We are less scared of them, because of their size, so we just blaze ahead and do whatever we feel like. We already barely recognize stress and fear signs in full size horses, we are FAR less likely to pay attention to them in a small horse. . . What do you think? Why do you think ponies have a bad wrap in some circles? . . #twetraininghorses #twetrainingvideo #horses #horsesofinstagram #instahorse #animallovers #animallover #positivereinforcement #clickertraining #positivehorsemanship #horsetrainer #traininghorses #horsetrainer #horsemanship #clickertrainedhorse #thewillingequine #picoftheday #pony #minipony #smallhorse #kidsandponies #cute #adorable #beautiful - 3 months ago

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