coffeecollectif

The Coffee Collective

Exploring exceptional coffee experiences in a manner that improves living conditions of farmers across the globe. We are a roastery and four bars.

We have taken something special from two worlds and paired it, creating an experience that continues to unfold. 
The atmosphere last night was amazing, when we held a dessert- and coffee pairing event in collaboration with the renowned dessert experts, Winterspring at their dessert bar. 
We look forward to sharing new dates with you soon!

We have taken something special from two worlds and paired it, creating an experience that continues to unfold. The atmosphere last night was amazing, when we held a dessert- and coffee pairing event in collaboration with the renowned dessert experts, Winterspring at their dessert bar. We look forward to sharing new dates with you soon! - 2 days ago

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It’s always a pleasure to visit Edwin on his Guatemalan farm, Finca Vista Hermosa. If you feel like tasting his coffee it’s available in our web shop and coffee shops. 
You can read more from Edwin in our blog series on our website about the Coffee Paradox - the one from the farmers’ perspective.

It’s always a pleasure to visit Edwin on his Guatemalan farm, Finca Vista Hermosa. If you feel like tasting his coffee it’s available in our web shop and coffee shops. You can read more from Edwin in our blog series on our website about the Coffee Paradox - the one from the farmers’ perspective. - 2 days ago

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Another day in Guatemala, another insight to how good coffee is processed. 
This is the first step of washing after the cherries have been picked. 
They empty the bags of cherries into this tank of water. From here the cherries will go in to the depulper where the coffee beans will be cut out of the cherry.

Another day in Guatemala, another insight to how good coffee is processed. This is the first step of washing after the cherries have been picked. They empty the bags of cherries into this tank of water. From here the cherries will go in to the depulper where the coffee beans will be cut out of the cherry. - 3 days ago

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Depulping Guatemalan cherries by hand.

Depulping Guatemalan cherries by hand. - 4 days ago

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Say hello to Edwin! He runs the Guatemalan farm Finca Vista Hermosa. 
Behind him coffee trees dominate the sides of the steep mountains, which are soon ready to be harvested.

Say hello to Edwin! He runs the Guatemalan farm Finca Vista Hermosa. Behind him coffee trees dominate the sides of the steep mountains, which are soon ready to be harvested. - 4 days ago

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The mesmerising sight that meets you when visiting the wet mill at Finca Vista Hermosa in Huehuetenango, Guatemala. 
These beans have been depulped and are soon ready to go to the dry mill.

The mesmerising sight that meets you when visiting the wet mill at Finca Vista Hermosa in Huehuetenango, Guatemala. These beans have been depulped and are soon ready to go to the dry mill. - 5 days ago

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Last week we had the pleasure to follow Klaus’ journey visiting farmers in Kenya. From there we go to Guatemala visiting the family behind the farm, Finca Vista Hermosa. 
From left, bar managers in our coffee shops Anna Ida and Janis, farm manager Edwin Martinez, our co-founder Peter Dupont and finally Edwin Martinez Senior. 
Here we are standing in front of the wet mill on the patios where the beans are drying under the sun before they go to the dry mill.

Last week we had the pleasure to follow Klaus’ journey visiting farmers in Kenya. From there we go to Guatemala visiting the family behind the farm, Finca Vista Hermosa. From left, bar managers in our coffee shops Anna Ida and Janis, farm manager Edwin Martinez, our co-founder Peter Dupont and finally Edwin Martinez Senior. Here we are standing in front of the wet mill on the patios where the beans are drying under the sun before they go to the dry mill. - 6 days ago

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That’s it from Kenya for this time! Hope you enjoyed our stories and hopefully learned a bit on the way. We have Kieni AA on the menu until the new harvest arrives. Enjoy!

That’s it from Kenya for this time! Hope you enjoyed our stories and hopefully learned a bit on the way. We have Kieni AA on the menu until the new harvest arrives. Enjoy! - 8 days ago

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Joseph Ngari is one of the Kieni farmers we try to visit every year. The first time we met him, we were actually visiting his neighbor but he came and asked politely if we would like to see his shambas (small farm). Klaus went with him and was so impressed with his passion and dedication to his coffee trees that we decided to write an article about him for our magazine.

Joseph loves his SL 28 and 34 variety trees, some which are over 60 years old. As you can see the trunk is very thick but only has two or three stems growing from them. These days he is pruning the trees so they will only have two healthy stems, allowing sufficient nutrients to the coffee cherries.

Since we last visited him in November he has built a small nursery for other plants and trees than coffee. He will plan three eucalyptus trees in the farm to provide more foliage and shade for the trees.

The big hole is an experiment for planting new coffee trees. The sun will scorch the surface in the hole and protect from deceases. Then the hole will be filled with manure and top soil mixed and the trees is planted in the middle.

Between coffee trees he is planting Vetva grass which is a natural insect repellent. He also has some home made traps for the coffee berry borer and ants.

Right now all his coffee is delivered to Kieni and he had a good crop compared to the average farmer. He is still drying his Mbunis (natural processed) coffee at the farm which will be taken to the mill later.

Thanks for having us Jospeh and we look forward to visit you and Kieni next year!

Joseph Ngari is one of the Kieni farmers we try to visit every year. The first time we met him, we were actually visiting his neighbor but he came and asked politely if we would like to see his shambas (small farm). Klaus went with him and was so impressed with his passion and dedication to his coffee trees that we decided to write an article about him for our magazine. Joseph loves his SL 28 and 34 variety trees, some which are over 60 years old. As you can see the trunk is very thick but only has two or three stems growing from them. These days he is pruning the trees so they will only have two healthy stems, allowing sufficient nutrients to the coffee cherries. Since we last visited him in November he has built a small nursery for other plants and trees than coffee. He will plan three eucalyptus trees in the farm to provide more foliage and shade for the trees. The big hole is an experiment for planting new coffee trees. The sun will scorch the surface in the hole and protect from deceases. Then the hole will be filled with manure and top soil mixed and the trees is planted in the middle. Between coffee trees he is planting Vetva grass which is a natural insect repellent. He also has some home made traps for the coffee berry borer and ants. Right now all his coffee is delivered to Kieni and he had a good crop compared to the average farmer. He is still drying his Mbunis (natural processed) coffee at the farm which will be taken to the mill later. Thanks for having us Jospeh and we look forward to visit you and Kieni next year! - 8 days ago

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Here you have Josphat and Charles from Kieni tasting the first production batch of the @lakridsbybulow Coffee Kieni Licorice 🖤

Here you have Josphat and Charles from Kieni tasting the first production batch of the @lakridsbybulow Coffee Kieni Licorice 🖤 - 9 days ago

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This is David Maguta, a young coffee producer we met in Kenya. He reached out to us via Instagram and invited us to his farm Maguta Estate in the Muruguru area of Nyeri.

His farm is 4 acres at 1732 m.a.s.l. with 3000 trees of the Ruiru varietal coffee that is slightly over 26 years old. Just like David.

He took over the farm from his mother recently and is working on selling his coffee directly to roasters now. Formerly his family has been taking it to the local coffee factory (wet mill) for processing in the cooperative.

Now he process his coffee on a hand-pulper and ferment in the small concrete tanks you see in the video. The living room is currently full of parchment coffee which he will take to the dry mill soon.

It’s fantastic to meet young farmers like this in a country where the average age of a farmer is well over 55. For many years the young generations didn’t see any future in coffee. But it’s starting to change slightly now and we hope David will have a successful business venture. We’re looking forward to taste the sample of his coffee he gave us.

This is David Maguta, a young coffee producer we met in Kenya. He reached out to us via Instagram and invited us to his farm Maguta Estate in the Muruguru area of Nyeri. His farm is 4 acres at 1732 m.a.s.l. with 3000 trees of the Ruiru varietal coffee that is slightly over 26 years old. Just like David. He took over the farm from his mother recently and is working on selling his coffee directly to roasters now. Formerly his family has been taking it to the local coffee factory (wet mill) for processing in the cooperative. Now he process his coffee on a hand-pulper and ferment in the small concrete tanks you see in the video. The living room is currently full of parchment coffee which he will take to the dry mill soon. It’s fantastic to meet young farmers like this in a country where the average age of a farmer is well over 55. For many years the young generations didn’t see any future in coffee. But it’s starting to change slightly now and we hope David will have a successful business venture. We’re looking forward to taste the sample of his coffee he gave us. - 9 days ago

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Visit to Konyu factory in Kirinyaga county in Kenya today. This small factory is situated close to the town of Kerugoya and is part of the Kabare society.

It has impressed us on the cupping table the last couple of years so today Klaus paid their manager Josphat Gitumu Wambuci and accountant Nancy Wangeci Kaguuru a visit.

Visit to Konyu factory in Kirinyaga county in Kenya today. This small factory is situated close to the town of Kerugoya and is part of the Kabare society. It has impressed us on the cupping table the last couple of years so today Klaus paid their manager Josphat Gitumu Wambuci and accountant Nancy Wangeci Kaguuru a visit. - 10 days ago

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